Run Rabbit Run 100: Accurate course map, mileages, GPX, and pace chart

It always looks better on paper.

The Run Rabbit Run 100 course was changed significantly in 2018. To assist future participants with race planning, at least until information from race organizers is more complete and accurate, I am sharing several resources:

  • Interactive course map
  • Course GPX
  • Mileage chart
  • Pace/split chart

Interactive course map

A topographic map of the course is available. However, it’s a static JPG image, and the course overlaid onto it is not always precise.

I recorded the entire 100-mile course with a Suunto Ambit3 Peak GPS watch, with its GPS ping frequency set to 5 seconds (“Good”). I was also wearing a Stryd foot pod, which is more accurate than the watch on its own.

The resulting track is fairly accurate; to get something better, a commercial-grade GPS unit would have to be used. Depending on your watch and your watch settings, the distances recorded by your watch may be shorter or longer than those recorded by mine, either consistently or inconsistently.

To create this interactive map, I:

  • Downloaded my race as a GPX file in Movescount.
  • Imported the file to CalTopo, my go-to mapping platform.
  • Added markers for the aid stations.

This map can be viewed with multiple map and imagery layers, including FSTopo 2016 (my pick), USGS 7.5-minute, Google Terrain, and Landsat.

View the map here, https://caltopo.com/m/F810.

Course GPX

If you would like a GPX or KML file of the course, export it from CalTopo at the link above. Depending on your intended use, you may want to only export limited data from my interactive map.

Mileage chart

Like the course map, an official mileage chart was available for the 2018 race, but it was a static file (in this case, a PDF) and it was not always accurate. For example, the official distances between aid stations were, on average, 0.42 miles (or 7 percent) off, and in one case listed a distance that was 1.3 miles short of the actual distance.

Using the GPX track recorded by my Ambit, I created a new mileage chart, below.

  • View this chart in a new window.
  • To download it as an Excel file or , go here and look under File > Download as.
  • To create your own copy in Google Sheets, log into your Google account (if you are not already), go here, and then look under File > Make a copy.

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Pace/split chart

Last year I posted in in-depth tutorial on creating pace charts for ultramarathons. I won’t repeat the process here.

As the “model race,” I used splits from the 2018 winner, Jason Schlarb, who seemed to run a more even race than other elites like Jeff Browning, Seth Swanson, and Kyle Pietari (who all had rough patches), or myself and Jeff Colt (who started too aggressively and faded later).

  • View this chart in a new window.
  • To download it as an Excel file or , go here and look under File > Download as or
  • To create your own copy in Google Sheets, log into your Google account (if you are not already), go here, and then look under File > Make a copy.

Questions about the course or how to edit this data? Leave a comment.

Posted in on October 15, 2018
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16 Comments

  1. Jay on October 15, 2018 at 3:26 pm

    I used your pace chart tutorial with some modifications and drawing lines in caltopo to make my own profile data to help a friend prepare for Mogollon Monster last month. I don’t run distances longer than half-marathons, so it’s not for me, but I did immensely enjoy the analytical work of helping her prepare, and your guidance was instrumental, so thanks!

  2. Steve Sims on October 16, 2018 at 8:21 am

    Steve Clark appears to be amused by your post race pass out.

  3. scott simcox on October 16, 2018 at 12:35 pm

    Did your footpod last the entire race? Is it supposed to be 20 hours on that?

    • Andrew Skurka on October 16, 2018 at 12:51 pm

      Yes, it went the duration. I don’t know what the lifespan is, but I feel like I very rarely have to recharge it, even when running 15 hours per week.

  4. Kevin Wheat on October 17, 2018 at 8:07 am

    I was told by the RDs that they plan on changing the course again for the 2019 running of the event.

    • Andrew Skurka on October 17, 2018 at 8:29 am

      Sounds like it’s a possibility but not a definite. Will be contingent on some trails being built and on permitting for commercial use of public land.

  5. Brandon on October 24, 2018 at 5:39 am

    Great info! Not sure how many of your readers are ultrarunners and appreciate the race-related info, but I enjoy it quite a bit. Nice work on a tough course – what else do you have on the schedule this year?

  6. Allen on September 5, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Andrew, thanks for the detailed info on RRR100! I’m running this year and I would like to use your GPX file on my Suunto 9 watch so I downloaded the file from Caltopo but it will not upload to Movescount for some reason. Any thoughts or workarounds would be much appreciated…
    Thanks!

  7. Allen Currano on September 5, 2019 at 8:19 am

    Nevermind! I was able to download the GPX from your strava and upload that file to movescount. For some reason movescount would not upload the gpx file that i downloaded from Caltopo but it worked when I got it from Strava. Thanks!!!

    • Andrew Skurka on September 5, 2019 at 8:33 am

      Have a great race.

      • Allen Currano on September 10, 2019 at 6:29 pm

        Thanks Andrew! I also found your spreadsheet really helpful for creating my own pace chart. Thanks for doing the work and sharing it!

  8. Brian Hill on September 8, 2019 at 1:17 pm

    Very helpful – thanks for the data! I was looking for splits from other yrs and couldn’t find anything so this helps. Any idea if this year’s course is the same as last year’s? Are Flash of Gold and Billy’s Rabbit Hole the same? -Brian

    • Andrew Skurka on September 10, 2019 at 3:29 pm

      I don’t know if the course has changed for 2019, but I doubt it — it takes a lot of work to re-route a course, due to permitting and logistical planning.

  9. Allen Currano on September 10, 2019 at 6:26 pm

    I asked on the Facebook page for the race, and was told the course is the same as last year. Although there are some minor deviations on the first climb apparently, but that seems to be the only change.

  10. Allen on September 19, 2019 at 12:21 pm

    Update on the course – The start was a bit longer but less steep this year compared to previous years. Due to construction they re-routed the start so it went up the dirt road to some singletrack and then back to the ski area access road which has a pretty reasonable grade as it winds up the mountain. The total mileage was about 107 as measured on my Suunto 9 at the most accurate setting. The consensus seems to be somewhere around 105-108 miles at least for this year’s course. Total elevation gain was around 16k on my watch and 18k when uploaded to strava.

  11. Allen Currano on September 19, 2019 at 12:30 pm

    Also, for anyone doing this race I found Andrew’s spreadsheet split time generator based on Jason Schlarb’s splits to be extremely helpful. It calculated splits for a 24 hour finish which I found pretty much spot on in practice. I ended up finishing in 24:45 but I got lost and did an extra 4 miles around mile 82, for a total of 111 miles. I’m pretty sure I would have finished under 24h without the extra miles. I was conservative on the first 50-60 miles and still over 30 min ahead of splits at mile 55. Passed a few people between 55-82 and was in 2nd place when I got lost, ended up 6th Tortoise. Felt strong the entire race up until mile 90 or so when I had some GI issues so I did slow down a bit in the last 20 but not too badly. Was surprised how much of the course is runnable. Great race, highly recommend!

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