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Archive | Gear Lists

A backpacking gear list is extraordinarily useful, and developing one is time well spent. It:

  • Helps in assembling a gear kit, without commandeering floor space;
  • Calculates pack weight;
  • Creates a budget and shopping list;
  • Serves as a checklist during final pack-up; and,
  • Is a reference for future trips, especially if post-trip comments were added to the gear list after returning home.

If you have never created a gear list before, start with my Three-season gear checklist & template, which is user-friendly, comprehensive, and neutral to location, season, gender, and experience level. For gear lists and posts with more specific recommendations, follow its links or look elsewhere in this category.

My group foot care kit for hiking and backpacking. For solo trips, I carry fewer items and less of each item.

Gear List || Backpacking Foot Care Kit for blisters & maceration

How many hiking and backpacking trips have been set back, or even ruined, by blisters, maceration, and other podiatric problems? Quite a few — including some of mine, unfortunately. To minimize these issues, I carry a dedicated foot care kit. I consider it a separate entity than my backpacking first aid kit. It contains several […]

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A gear explosion in Amanda's 600 square foot apartment. It did not go over well when she arrived home from work.

A backpacking gear list: Its importance and core functions

On a trip planning checklist, what’s the most time-consuming task? Making travel plans, preparing food, selecting a route — yes, they can all rank up there. But gear selection probably tops the list, especially for new backpackers and for veteran backpackers without experience in a particular location or season. A gear list will make this process much easier, for current […]

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wound-care

Gear List || Backpacking First Aid Kit for soloists & groups

What I carry in my backpack is not a substitute for what’s between my ears. This is especially true with my first aid kit when hiking and backpacking in the wilderness: rather than thinking of this collection of items as a get-out-of-jail-free card, I’m much better served by having researched beforehand the environmental and route conditions I will likely encounter, […]

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My most popular & favorite posts of 2015

To close out 2015, I’d like to share my most popular posts. My method in creating the list was only partially scientific — I started with total page views for 2015 in Google Analytics, and then I loosely accounted for publishing dates, since posts released earlier in the year have had more time to be viewed than those released […]

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My winter backpacking stove system

Gear List || Winter backpacking stove system for 1-2 people

To have water for drinking and cooking when backpacking in the winter, I use a stove system that can efficiently melt snow. My gear list: Relevant conditions I pack my winter stove system when I have no or unreliable access to natural water sources — i.e. less than several times per day, and not necessarily […]

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Hot & Heavy Stove System

Gear List || Stable backpacking stove system for groups & Philmont

With a few tweaks, my favorite solo backpacking stove system, The Cadillac, is a viable 2-person setup. But it’s a good solution only for those who are highly weight-conscious and/or who have unreliable access to pressurized gas canisters. Another go-to setup, Fast & Light, could also be used as a group stove, but for large pots […]

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The Cadillac Stove System

Gear List || Premium & ultralight backpacking alcohol stove system

Between 2006 and April 2015, I made over one-thousand meals and hot drinks with The Dirtbag. Clearly, that system works. But it’s also imperfect. I was particularly tired of its poor performance in non-calm air; its unreliable stability was not a winning quality, either. So I upgraded to The Cadillac, and I don’t foresee going […]

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The complete Dirtbag stove system. A DIY alcohol stove + aluminum foil windscreen, plus a number of other inexpensive components. The entire system weighs about 9 oz and costs $30.

Gear List || DIY, ultralight & cheap backpacking alcohol stove system

Before I upgraded this year, the Dirtbag had been my go-to 3-season backpacking stove system. I used it for the length of the Great Western Loop, during the non-winter portions of the Alaska-Yukon Expedition, and for hundreds of nights on shorter outings and guided trips. The stove and windscreen are DIY, and the system is […]

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A camp during my Kings Canyon High Basin Route thru-hike, with the Cadillac Stove System

Backpacking Stoves: Five complete systems for soloists & groups

What are the backpacking stove systems that I use in 3-season and winter conditions when solo, as a couple, or in a group? In this multi-post series I will detail them, with complete gear lists and in-depth explanations of my selections. This is not meant to be a definitive list of viable stove systems. There are literally […]

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